Course List

Algebra II - College Prep/Honors

Students will study linear equations and inequalities, matrices, operations and applications of functions. Students will study powers and radicals, exponentials and logarithms, sequences and series, and probability and statistics. Graphing calculators ( TI 84 ) are a required and integrated part of this course. The students will work cooperatively with a variety of assessment strategies employed. Problem solving will be stressed. At the honors level, this course is designed for students who have been highly successful in Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 Honors and who are candidates for AP Calculus. This course will be a more extensive study of the algebraic concepts traditionally covered in Algebra 2 and includes the study of logarithmic and polynomial functions. Students will be required to work with more intensity, at a deeper level, and produce a wider range of more complex and difficult material.

Business Computer Applications

This course covers basic computer history, theory, operating systems and applications. MS Office is used to teach word processing (WORD), spreadsheets (EXCEL), databases (ACCESS), and presentations (PowerPoint).

Contemporary Publishing and Editing

Designed to teach the rudiments of contemporary editing via the rules set forth in the Chicago Manual of Style, 14th edition.Students will focus on the language of both the editor and proofreader and everything from grammar to copyright laws.

Creative Nonfiction I

This course focuses on self-discovery and includes portraits, encounters and memoirs, along with the more tradi­tional personal essay. Works read and discussed include selections by E.B. White, Annie Dillard, Alice Walker, Jamaica Kincaid, Edward Hoagland and James Baldwin.

Creative Nonfiction II

A continuation of Creative Nonfiction I, this course pays close attention to voice, style and tone. There is also a fo­cus on the extended essay, with an emphasis on revision. Students read, analyze and interpret contemporary essay­ists such as Susan Orlean, John McPhee and Ian Frazier, among others.

Creative Writing Independent Study

In this course seniors work independently on a manuscript of 40-50 pages in one genre. At the close of the course, each student presents a reading from his/her manuscript, open to the public.

Fiction I

This course focuses on the elements of the short story and includes a wide reading of accomplished fiction writers, daily writing, and both group and individual critique. The course emphasizes theme and its formulation, plot, characteriza­tion, atmosphere, symbolism, point of view, dialogue and aspects of style. Students read fiction by Flannery O'Connor, Raymond Carver, Charles D'Ambrosio, Tim O'Brien, Tobias Wolff and Lorie Moore, among many others.

Fiction II

This course emphasizes the development of individual voice and style through daily writing. It includes reading relevant works and writing reviews and stories, keeping journals, ex­tensive revision, discussion and analysis.

Fiction III

Designed as an intensive continuation of work finished in Fiction II, students will be expected to write at least fifteen pages per week, following the same narrative strand as in their previous class.

Poetry I

This course is designed to explore the art of writing poetry, focusing on the elements most relevant to poets writing today, and presented from the point of view of practicing po­ets. Included is an examination of poetic diction, rhythm, metered and free verse, figurative language and symbols, tone, meaning and idea. This introductory course involves extensive reading, writing and informal critique. Students are exposed to the works of such poets as Mary Oliver, Mark Doty, Donald Hall, Stanley Kunitz, Lisel Mueller and Yusef Komunyakaa.

Poetry II: Writing in Form

A nine-week course in the fixed form: the sonnet, villanelle, sestina, haiku, among others. Students read widely and complete at least ten formed poems and a series of haiku through rigorous revision. Study involves extended reading as well as critical writing, plus group and individual critique.

Screenwriting I

Students discover what it means to write for film, with an emphasis on developing an original idea they can expand into a full-length script. In addition to learning the process of screenwriting and the structure of a typical script, students will read and analyze screenplays by writers such as Wil­liam Goldman, Alan Ball, Robert Benton and Bo Goldman.

Screenwriting II

Designed to be a carry-over of work completed in Screenwriting I, students in this course will continue their study of the screenplay structure, as they expand their scripts toward completion. The course includes intense study of screenplays and screenwriters, including examination of various current films, both commercial and independent.

Honors Ballet Technique

An intense course of study based upon long-established concepts and ideas taken from the Vaganova, Cecchetti, R.A.D. and Cuban schools. Students develop the physical and mental coordination, the refined sense of music and movement, and the muscular strength and flexibility necessary for a successful professional career in dance.

Honors Pointe Technique/Variation/Pas De Deux

One of the defining elements of classical ballet, Pointe Technique focuses on acquiring strength in order to create lightness and elegance. The B class students learn to dance on pointe with ease and elegance and to use basic vocabulary relative to various positions of the body, arms, and head. The A class students work toward gaining a solid understanding and control of the technique in order to perform demanding combinations with ease and intricate coordination. Ballet Variation classes provide an opportunity for students to learn a variety of classical and contemporary solo works. Great attention is given to clean execution and transitions of movements, sense of style, and musicality. In addition to developing rehearsal skills, they will gain valuable insight into the performance process and will broaden their perspective on the history of each variation, deepening their engagement with the role At the discretion of the faculty, students may be invited to attend Pas de Deux classes as an alternative of some Pointe Technique/Variation classes. Due to the potential for physical injury, only the most appropriately conditioned females can participate in these classes.

Honors Acting 3A

This course begins developing a genuine understanding of the actor’s craft, exploring techniques and theories essential to theatrical performance. Students are introduced to the Stanislavski system and exercises of Sanford Meisner, Uta Hagen, Lee Strasberg, Robert Lewis and others. Actors learn to define and identify the components of technique through script analysis. Improvisational exercises emphasize ensemble, commitment, risk, imagination, and intuition. The work culminates in the rehearsal and performance of selected scenes.

Honors Acting 3B

This course expands upon the foundations learned in Acting 3A classes. Actors are challenged to apply their knowledge of acting technique to improvisational situations and non-dramatic material. Text analysis may include playwriting and the investigation of plays from the American Realist genre. Students progress toward integrating the analytical and intuitive components of acting through the rehearsal of selected scenes, which are formally presented in the Spring Scene Showcase.

Honors Acting 4A

This course encompasses the process of rehearsing and performing a play or theatre project. In rehearsals, students apply physical, vocal, and interpretive skills as they transform into dramatically viable characters. In technical rehearsals, actors learn to incorporate costumes, lighting, scenic elements and props into their performances and develop a more comprehensive understanding of the theatrical process. Work culminates in performance before a public audience, as actors synthesize elements of training and rehearsal.

Honors Acting 4B

This course explores elements of character and style. Students broaden their knowledge of acting as they approach material that makes increased demands on their physical, vocal, technical and imaginative resources. Topics may be drawn from contemporary, modern and/or classical drama.

Honors Special Topics 3A

This course includes classes designed to augment the Drama curriculum by offering experiences in areas not wholly encompassed in traditional acting classes. In the first year, students develop an awareness of dramatic movement. The training encourages flexible, well-conditioned bodies that will respond readily to the creative demands of acting. Students will also develop specific movement skills. Topics are drawn from alignment, physical conditioning, theatre movement, stage combat, tai chi, tap dance, modern dance, jazz dance, yoga, pilates, mask, gymnastics, circus skills, and physical comedy. Participation outside class time is required.

Honors Special Topics 3B

This course continues the movement studies begun in the previous semester. As actors develop more responsive instruments, they begin to distinguish between habitual physical expression and more organic, dynamic, and stage worthy responses, while acquiring valuable professional skills. Topics are drawn from alignment, physical conditioning, theatre movement, stage combat, tai chi, tap dance, modern dance, jazz dance, mask, yoga, pilates, gymnastics, circus skills and physical comedy. Participation outside class time is required.

Honors Special Topics 4A

In the third semester, the course is devoted to topics that most support this stage in the actor’s development, and may vary according to need. Topics may include monologue and audition preparation, stage combat, singing, interdisciplinary studies, performance projects, theatre history, professional aspects, critical perspectives, fundamentals of technical theatre, and stage management. Participation in events outside regular class time continues to be a required aspect of this course.

Honors Special Topics 4B

The final semester of this course introduces the actor to possibilities and potentials which contribute to a successful, lifelong, self-directed pursuit of excellence. Topics may include audition workshops, stage combat, singing, performance history, critical perspectives, fundamentals of technical theater, stage management, and original performance projects.

Honors Voice and Speech 3A

This course is devoted to the following topic areas: physical alignment, breathing, vocal production, the anatomy and mechanics of the human voice, articulation, an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet (Skinner System), phonetic transcription and scoring, and vocal analysis of text.

Honors Voice and Speech 3B

The second semester is devoted to continuing development of the first semester topics as well as introducing and/or developing the following topic areas: Text analysis, non-dramatic texts, scoring the text, synthesizing the vocal character with the physical and psychological character.

Honors Voice and Speech 4A

The first semester of the second year is devoted to incorporating other voice training styles of schools of thought (expl: Linklater, Berry) in order for students to evaluate and develop a personal system. This semester will also focus on the following topic areas: Classical texts, non-dramatic texts and applications, dialects, descriptive and prescriptive grammar.

Honors Voice and Speech 4B

This final semester will be devoted to personal assessment/evaluation, application and synthesis. The student will work to solidify a personal approach to voice in acting. The student will also complete a “voice and speech portfolio” that serves as documentation of coursework and a reference tool.

AP English Literature and Composition

This seminar introduces students to college-level study of major literary works in a variety of genres by a range of authors. In addition to major works by British and American authors (Shakespeare to Conrad, Hawthorne to Morrison) central to any college curriculum, students read globally and across time periods. Close textual analysis is grounded in careful study of the social and historical contexts of literature. The course also integrates other works of art (paintings, music, film) that intersect with readings in meaningful ways. The organizing focus is a study of three major literary genres: drama, poetry, and fiction. The course covers broad literary ground and review critical terminology that will increase the clarity and precision of students’ written responses to literature.

English II

In addition to fulfilling the state curriculum standards for English I, students will read, discuss and write about works of literature primarily by authors from around the world writing in English, including those from, but not limited to, England, Ireland, India, the Caribbean, and Africa. Foundational texts in translation, such as ancient Greek tragedy, will also shape the curriculum, as well as other texts of interest with thematic connections. In conjunction with these primary texts, students will explore films and other visual media, "reading" their visual and structural elements.

English III/IV

In addition to fulfilling the state curriculum standards for English III/IV, this course focuses on a range of readings on American identity. Students read, discuss, and write about a variety of literary forms by authors from a range of historical and cultural perspectives. The course will emphasize broad global and artistic contexts of American literature, and will take an interdisciplinary approach whenever appropriate. Class work is differentiated for individual students at all levels (including College Prep when needed), and students will have flexibility about changing levels in the early weeks of the course.

English IV/V

In addition to fulfilling the state curriculum standards for English IV, this advanced course involves students in reading, discussing, and writing about a variety of literary forms--short stories, novels, poems, essays, and plays--by a series of authors from different cultures and periods. The course takes a global approach, combining American, British, and world literature. Additionally, participants analyze films, works of art, and musical compositions that complement the literary study at hand. In all of these pursuits the course focuses on close reading and attentiveness to the gestures and strategies within works with the larger goal of readers and writers refining their rhetoric, skills of argumentation, and ultimately, their logic and thinking. English V elective credit will be awarded to students taking this course who have already earned the state's four minimum English credits. Seniors applying to competitive colleges, conservatories, universities, and art schools are strongly encouraged to take English (AP Literature or English V) in their senior year.

Humanities I and II

The humanities curriculum highlights connections between and among artistic and academic disciplines. The course focuses on three broad, guiding questions: Who are we as artists? Why do we do what we do? Why do the arts have value for society? Through a series of readings, discussions, film screenings, guest artists and scholars, panels, and other activities, students will pursue their own answers to these lifelong questions. Juniors take Humanities I, which introduces students to each of our five arts disciplines. Seniors in Humanities II develop and present a PechaKucha talk as a sort of capstone to their SCGSAH experience. Both courses also help students reflect on their experiences in this community.

Introduction to Humanities

This course is designed to introduce sophomores to the Governor’s School experience and to the interdisciplinary nature of the Humanities curriculum. Students work with upperclassmen for some programs, and they work with the guiding questions of the upper-level course in a curriculum designed for dance and music students.

AP Calculus AB

This is a course for the mathematically gifted student capable of college-level work. This course focuses on limits, differentiation and integration of elementary functions. The course outline reflects the content currently recommended by the College Entrance Examination Board. Students enrolled in the course are required to take the AP Calculus Exam in the spring.

Geometry - College Prep/Honors

Students will work in perpendicular and parallel lines, polygons, circles, congruence, similarity, perimeter, area, volume, inductive and deductive reasoning and proofs. Students will also learn basic constructions. Problem solving is stressed and a variety of assessment strategies will be employed. At the honors level, students will have a more rigorous course involving proof of properties of parallel lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and similarity. Students will also do projects involving area, volume, transformations and circles. Additional topics of geometric probability and logic will be part of this course.

Precalculus - College Prep/Honors

Precalculus is a program of mathematical studies focusing on the development of the students ability to understand and apply the study of functions and advanced mathematics concepts to solve problems. The course will include a thorough study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Other topics studied are sequences, series, vectors, conic sections, parametric equations, and polar curves. At the honors level, students will study polynomials from a graphical approach as well as logarithmic and exponential functions. A more rigorous approach to trigonometry and its applications will be studied. Students are being prepared for the study of calculus, and topics will be expanded to include statistical means of arriving at mathematical models. Cooperative problem solving, and open-ended long range assignments will prepare students for university expectations.

Probability and Statistics - College Prep

Probability and Statistics is a course in which students learn the fundamental principles of probability and statistics and apply these principles to data analysis. Students will be encouraged to utilize the skills emphasized in this course through projects, investigations, case studies and other appropriate methods. The students will work with sets of data to perform analyses and summarize the results; examine ways to organize and display data and draw conclusions about relationships that may exist in data sets. In addition students learn fundamental probability concepts, the binomial distribution and the normal distribution.

Conducting - Elective - Grade Level: 11 or 12

This course serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of conducting. The class focuses on basic conducting patterns, left hand independence and simple re­hearsal techniques. Class participants are expected to demonstrate skills, coordination, interpretation and leadership.

Jazz Orchestra- Elective - Grade Level: 11 or 12

Jazz Orchestra is an elective performing ensemble of flexible instrumentation open by audition to all music students. The Jazz Orchestra performs two concerts per year and represents the school in various off-campus events.

Jazz Improvisation - Electives - Grade Level: 11 or 12

This course is a study of basic improvi­sation as it applies to the jazz literature from Blues to Mod­ern Jazz. The course deals with learning the fundamentals of jazz improvisation, arpeggios, scales and modes as they apply to jazz literature.

Lessons

All Students receive a one-hour lesson per week on their instrument of specialization.

Master Class

All music students participate in weekly master classes in their area of study: piano, strings, brass, winds, per¬cussion, or voice.

Music History, Grade Level: 12

This course is a survey that addresses music history and style in the Western tradition. The course explores the de­velopment of musical style, placing composers and their music in an historical context progressing chronologically from medieval times through the twentieth century. It in­cludes weekly lectures with reading, listening and writing assignments to be done outside of class.

Music Theory, Grade Level: 11

This course is designed to create a foundation for compre­hending the basic principles of written harmony including scales, intervals, harmony, rhythm, and musical analysis. Included is a component of aural skills with material center­ing on singing using solfege and numbers, dictation, key­board skills, critical listening and analysis. Students prepar­ing for the AP exam may also be required to take an AP Seminar course offered in the second semester.

Piano Class - Elective - Grade Level: 11 or 12

Piano Class is an elective keyboard class for students outside the piano area. Some level of skill is re­quired. Students are admitted by audition.

Piano Seminar

This course for piano students explores piano literature from Bach to the Twentieth Century through listening, discussion and analysis. A second course component develops keyboard skills and technique through study of scales, arpeggios, score reading, transposition, keyboard harmony and sight reading. For piano students.

Recital Attendance

All music students are required to attend all Governor's School music performances.

String Seminar

This course for violin, viola, cello and bass students is de­signed to explore technical and theoretical topics of interest to string players. Classes include lectures and research, as well as demonstrations, performances and analyses of technical issues. For violin, viola, cello and bass students.

Vocal Diction and Pedagogy Seminar

This course introduces vocal students to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and its system of pronunciation. This system is applied to English, Italian, French and Ger­man languages. The study of vocal technique is also a com­ponent of this course. For vocal students.

Wind and Percussion Techniques Seminar

This is a skills-oriented course for wind, brass, and percussion students, It is divided into three classes: Woodwinds, Brass, and Percussion. Each class meets twice weekly to develop skills in wind and percussion playing that include technique, articulation, intonation and ensemble playing. For wind, brass and percussion students.

Physical Education I/Personal Fitness

Physical Education I is student-centered, designed to allow each student the opportunity to develop the knowledge and the skills necessary to maintain a physically active and healthy lifestyle while meeting the required state standards for this course.

Biology - Honors

Students will investigate the chemistry of living things, the processes of living things (cell reproduction, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA, and protein synthesis), the structure and function of cells, DNA, evolution and classification, and genetics. An ecology project using the Reedy River will be performed. A survey of organisms in the five kingdoms will also be studied, using virtual dissection. Honors Biology provides students with opportunities to increase their scientific vocabulary, discover patterns, classify matter and reactions, develop critical thinking and analytical ability, and improve their research techniques, along with their written and verbal communication skills. Heavy emphasis is placed on subject content through scientific inquiry revelant to a cumulative end of course examination, which will be supported through laboratory investigations.

Chemistry - College Prep

In this course, students will learn the basic concepts, facts and principles of chemistry. Topics will include utilization of a graphing calculator, measurement, writing chemical formulas, naming chemical compounds, writing and balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, atomic structure, the periodic table and the gas laws.

Environmental Science - Honors

This course is a multi-disciplinary course that draws from all the sciences to help us better understand the relationship between humans and the world in which we live. It should be considered an applied science, one that applies the principles of pre-sciences like chemistry and biology to help achieve practical goals and solve issues associated with surmounting environmental concerns. Heavy emphasis is placed on subject content through scientific inquiry relevant to a cumulative final exam which is supported through laboratory investigations. To achieve these goals, this course will include inquiry based instruction, allowing students to engage in problem solving, decision making, critical thinking and applied learning opportunities.

Physics - Honors

This course provides each student with the opportunity to learn about fundamental physics concepts and principles, develop critical thinking and analytical skills, and improve written and verbal communication skills. The course is mathematically rigorous, requiring each student to demonstrate proficiency with advanced math such as Algebra II and Trigonometry. The topics covered include: methods and systems of measurement, structures and properties of matter, mathematical and graphical analysis of physical quantities, Newton’s Laws, energy, work, power, and momentum, the conservation laws, thermodynamics, properties of sound, light, electricity and magnetism and modern physics.

Honors American Government

American Government is an introductory course to the Americangovernmental system. Areas of emphasis include the Constitution, electoral process, functions of the three branches of government, and the role of state and local governments.

AP European History

This course is the equivalent of a college-level survey of European History from the Renaissance through the present day. Students will gain a greater understanding of factors that have shaped European society. Emphasis will be placed on analysis of primary documents and the writing of historical essays. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP exam.

AP Human Geography

This course is designed to provide students with the equivalent of a college introductory course to Human Geography. The course provides a systematic study of human geography, including the following topics: Nature and Perspectives on Geography; Population; Cultural Patterns and Processes; Political Organization of Space; Agricultural and Rural Land Use; Industrialization and Economic Development; Cities and Urban Land Use; Globalization. Focusing on these ideas will help students understand spatial interaction and behavior, use of the earth and its resources, political organization of space, human settlement patterns, globalization and the growth of urbanization. The use of maps and the significance of mental maps will be emphasized in the course. Using documents and other primary data, students will develop writing and analytical skills necessary to analyze point of view, context, and bias, and to understand and interpret information.

AP United States History

This course is the equivalent of a college survey course in U.S. History and prepares students for the AP U.S. History Exam in May. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis of primary documents and the writing of historical essays. Students who enroll in this demanding course must be willing to complete extensive reading and writing assignments. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP exam.

Honors Economics

Economics is an introductory course focusing on fundamental theories and principles. Key concepts associated with both microeconomics and macroeconomics are introduced; these concepts include economic systems, the relationship of supply and demand, the role of government, and monetary policy.

Honors Holocaust Seminar

This semester course will take a close look at the darkest crime of the Twentieth Century: the attempt by the Nazis to systematically destroy an entire group of humans, the Jews. The roots and causes of anti-Semitism will be explored as well as the tragic results. Included in the course are lessons on Jewish culture with a broad sweep of Jewish history and Judaism. The course concludes by comparing the Holocaust with other genocides, and a special emphasis will be placed upon preventing genocide today.

Honors United States History

This course, taught in conjunction with English III/IV, integrates the political and cultural history of the United States. As specifiedby the South Carolina curriculum standards, this survey course begins with the colonial period and continues through the present day. The culminating experience for the course is the production of a multi-media project that meets the criteria for the National History Day competition. This course fulfills the graduation requirement for one unit in United States history. Students are also simultaneously enrolled in Honors English III/IV: American Studies.

AP Art History

This course will focus on an overview of the art of Western cultures, beginning with prehistoric up to the mid-17th century. The course will also engage the art of non-Western traditions. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in discussion, quizzes, essays, exams.

AP Art History, Semester II

This course will survey the mid-17th century to modernism. The student will encounter contemporary themes and ideas in art criticism and writing. The student will come to terms with the impact that under-represented groups and alternate points of view have had on the way art is made, analyzed, and discussed in our time. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance,student participation in discussion, quizzes, essays, exams, AP exam optional.

Career Preparation

In Career Preparation, students will be introduced to methods of researching careers in dance. This will include colleges, school/conservatories, companies, trainee programs and summer intensives, as well as related financial aid and scholarship opportunities. We will examine various dance degrees and their practical uses, as well as a variety of dance related career alternatives. Student reflection papers, outlining their goals and aspirations, will help define future paths of action. Additionally, students will examine the fundamentals of portfolio preparation and college application/registration.

Department Elective: Bronze Casting

This is an elective senior studio course investigating the process and material of bronze casting. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance,student participation in discussion.

Honors 2-D Design

This course is based in abstract problem-solving assignments that establish and help to define and articulate the two-dimensional visual language essential to all visual arts disciplines. Line, shape, balance, contrast, surface organization (focus, rhythm, etc.), and texture will be explored in problem-solving applications. A variety of media and techniques will be utilized. The course works in conjunction with 3-D Design, Observational Drawing, Introduction to Graphic design, Motion Design, and Visual Language to create the core of the Foundation Year. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio and end-of-semester jury.

Honors 2-D Elective I

This course will follow up on the introductions offered in 2-D Studio. One of three areas of study may be selected from among: Graphic Design: The use of design principles will be applied to graphic design problems in identity packages, book cover design, poster design, CD cover design and other graphic applications. Printmaking: Relief printing techniques will be further developed in lino and wood block form. Students will be encouraged to do multiple color prints. The latter part of the term will be given over to the etching process. Photography: Students will be challenged to expand the aesthetic and technical uses of both traditional and digital photographic techniques experienced in 2-D Studio. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors 2-D Studio

The 2-D Studio explores the skills and abstract thinking acquired in first-semester 2-D courses in specific studio projects geared to the respective disciplines of photography and printmaking. Each studio unit will be nine weeks long. Intensive investigation in either of the two areas can be pursued in subsequent electives. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance,student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors 3-D Design

Using materials such as wire, cardboard, clay, wood, etc., the physical and tactile aspects of three-dimensional form and space will be investigated. Linear and planar relationships, volume, mass, scale, etc., will be explored with potential application to sculpture, architecture, etc. The course works in conjunction with 2-D Design, Observational Drawing, Introduction to Graphic design, Motion Design, and Visual Language to create the core of the Foundation Year. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance,student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors 3-D Elective I

Techniques and concepts encountered in 3-D Studio will be elaborated upon and expanded. The student may choose one elective from the following three: Architecture (only offered in 3-D Elective I): The process of developing, communicating, and applying three-dimensional design idea for functional buildings/objects will be explored in this course. Visual and verbal presentation of architectural ideas in drawing, design, and 3-D prototype model projects will be supported by guest professional visits. Ceramics: Functional and non-functional ceramics will be explored in slab, coil, and wheel-thrown work. Emphasis will be placed on various firing and surface techniques. The students will be encouraged to express individual interpretations of thematic assignments. Metals: Functional and non-functional objects created using a variety of fabrication and casting techniques will be explored in projects geared to formal language and personal expression. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors 3-D Studio

3-D Studio introduces the student to two studio areas, ceramics and metals, in nine-week units. It is intended to integrate the formal language acquired in 3-D Design within the disciplines involved. The possibility of future development in these areas will be provided in subsequent electives. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors Introduction to Graphic Design

The use of the computer as a design tool will be explored. Software applications will be integrated with principles and elements encountered in 2-D Design. This course is a prerequisite for subsequent graphic design courses. The course works in conjunction with 2-D Design, 3-D Design, Observational Drawing and Visual Language to create the core of the Foundation Year. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio and end-of-semester jury.

Honors Junior Painting

This course will introduce the student to the concepts, materials,and techniques of painting. Painting assignments will be directed toward a systematic study of color and its interactions. The course will integrate design and drawing systems in carefully considered painting problems. Thumbnail sketches, studies, etc., will be emphasized as part of the painting process. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, research and response papers, end-of-semester jury.

Honors Junior Sculpture

A variety of approaches to the sculptural process will be investigated. Through the exploration of basic techniques, 3-D design principles will be integrated in sculpture projects in various media. Junior Sculpture also deals with a tradition of working with the human figure as a foundation for formal understanding and as a way of integrating ideas into the life drawing class. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, research and response papers, end-of-semester jury.

Honors Observational Drawing

Through the use of a variety of media, this drawing course will introduce the student to the tools necessary for strong compositional structure. Beginning with line and progressing to perspective and value, this course will integrate areas covered in other foundation courses (2-D Design and 3-D Design) with drawing concepts. Scale and proportion will be emphasized in drawings executed from direct observation. Spatial relationships will be explored through overlapping planes, linear and atmospheric perspective, etc. The course works in conjunction with 2-D Design, 3-D Design, Introduction to Graphic design, Motion Design, and Visual Language to create the core of the Foundation Year. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors Senior Concentration/Senior Project

An area of personal and individual study will provide the framework for Senior Concentration/Senior Project. The concentration will involve readings, research as guided in the corresponding Research Methods course, and a body of related work. The concentration may be in any of the core or elective studio areas (animation, painting, sculpture, drawing, architecture, ceramics, graphic design, metals/jewelry, photography, printmaking), art history, or another area per faculty approval (ex. accessory design, book arts, film, illustration, etc.). A summation paper will accompany the semester's work. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, individual and group critiques, periodic review of research and studio work, end-of-semester jury.

Honors Senior Drawing

This course will revisit ideas and concepts encountered in previous drawing courses. The student will be presented with opportunities to extend his/her work in a personal direction. Students will also be encouraged to expand their conception of drawing. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance,student participation in studio work and discussion, board critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors Senior Life Drawing

This is an advanced drawing course which uses the figure in spatial and conceptual relationships. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors Senior Studio Elective: Animation, Painting, or Sculpture

Senior Animation provides the opportunity to explore a deeper understanding of weight, balance, anticipation, and follow-through by introducing hinged puppets and jointed figures. Using 2-D and 3-D assets, students will create simple narratives to communicate a concept. Emphasis will remain on moving elements while introducing additional techniques such as color correction, keying, and compositing. Senior Painting builds on the concepts learned in Junior Painting. Advanced compositional and color problems will be integrated with pictorial and thematic ideas. The student's emerging personal language will be supported. Senior Sculpture utilizes techniques acquired in Junior Sculpture as the basis for further technical development. Personal imagery will be encouraged along with the use of traditional and non-traditional materials. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Honors Visual Language

This course will supplement the foundation studio courses through presentation, discussion and written assignments.Visual elements will be shown within the context of their use throughout the various art disciplines, cultures, and media. Discussions and papers will engage the aesthetic and theoretical interpretations and applications of visual language. The course works in conjunction with 2-D Design, 3-D Design, Introduction to Graphic design, Motion Design, and Observational Drawing to create the core of the Foundation Year. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance,student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio and end-of-semester jury.

Life Drawing I

This course builds upon Observational Drawing and focuses on drawing from the model. Anatomy and proportional relationships will be emphasized. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, student participation in studio work and discussion, group critiques, graded assignments/portfolio, end-of-semester jury.

Career Preparation

This course introduces students to the methods and resources of researching careers and higher educational opportunities. General topics such as scholarships, applications, and resumes and curriculum vitae will be covered as students also learn professional practices in digitally documenting their own 2-D and 3-D work. The research and skills gained in Career Preparation will serve as the basis for continued development in the senior Portfolio Preparation course. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance, evaluation of quality and number of slides, completion of resume and artist’s statement, end-of-semester jury.

Portfolio Preparation

Portfolio Preparation builds upon the foundation established during Career Preparation to develop the professional materials (artwork documentation, artist's statement, resume/CV, etc.) required as part of the application process for many visual arts undergraduate programs and careers. Themes in contemporary art will also be addressed in practice of engaging and expressing complex ideas while serving as a starting point for further studies. Assessment and performance criteria will include: attendance,evaluation of quality and number of slides, completion of updated resumé and artist’s statement, end-of-semester jury.

French II

This course continues the skill development begun in Level I. Oral communication continues to be emphasized. Students use the present, past, and future tenses in level-appropriate Standards-based activities.

French III

This course expands the students' language skills at an advanced pace. Accurate control of language structures is emphasized in written and oral communication.

French IV

This course emphasizes continuing skill development according to national standards. French is used for all discussions and activities. Enthusiastic class participation is expected.

German II/III/IV

This advanced course focuses primarily on developing reading and listening skills through a multimedia approach and secondarily on enhancing writing and speaking skills in response to the media texts. Each unit of study is reinforced with simplified novels, scenes from plays, movie excerpts, and various other forms of media.

Spanish I

Spanish I is a college preparatory course designed to give students a basic foundation for continuing the study of the Spanish language and associated cultures. This course stresses effective communication in the target language as well as in developing life-long learning skills. The course introduces and facilitates learning basic vocabulary, grammar,pronunciation, skills in using resources, and cultural knowledge as a foundation for future study.

Spanish II

This course continues the skill development begun in Level I. Emphasis on oral communication is continued. Students use present, past, and future tenses in level-appropriate Standards-based activities.

Spanish III

This course expands students' language skills at an advanced pace. Accurate control of language structures is emphasized in written and oral communication.

Spanish IV

This course is designed to challenge students to expand upon and to use the knowledge and skills acquired from the successful completion of Spanish III. Students will be expected to continue to study and reinforce language skills and cultural knowledge and to use complex grammar structures and vocabulary in order to read, write, listen, and communicate verbally and creatively in the target language.

Chemistry - Honors

In this course, students will learn the basic concepts, facts and principles of chemistry. Topics will include utilization of a graphing calculator, measurement, writing chemical formulas, naming chemical compounds, writing and balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, atomic structure, the periodic table and the gas laws. Honors Chemistry provides students with opportunities to increase their scientific vocabulary, discover patterns, classify matter and reactions, develop critical thinking and analytical ability, and improve their research techniques, along with their written and verbal communication skills.

Environmental Science CP

This course is designed to promote an understanding of human impact on the environment. The course includes physical and chemical properties, living systems, and interrelationships. The course provides opportunities for student participation, research, field testing, experimentation, and decision making. Please note the Commission on Higher Education considers this a rigorous, upper level course and not an introductory class. To provide students with the proper rigorous background needed in the class, the prerequisites are Biology 1 AND Chemistry 1.

Honors Men's Technique/Variation/Pas De Deux

In Men’s Technique class, students acquire strength, speed, elevation, and the power necessary for batteries, tours, and specialized grand allegro jumps. Ballet Variation classes provide an opportunity for students to learn a variety of classical and contemporary solo works. Great attention is given to clean execution and transitions of movements, sense of style, and musicality. In addition to developing rehearsal skills, they will gain valuable insight into the performance process and will broaden their perspective on the history of each variation, deepening their engagement with the role. Literally the “step of two,” Pas de Deux classes are the culmination of a student’s training. Pas de Deux training begins with simple promenades, floor work, and basic pirouettes. Eventually, and only when the partners have developed the proper strength and timing, they can partake in the aerial work such as overhead lifts, throws, and catches. Due to the potential for physical injury, only the strongest males and the most appropriately conditioned females can participate in these classes.

Honors Modern Dance/Modern Fundamentals/Contemporary Dance Technique

The Modern Dance/Modern Fundamentals/Contemporary Dance Technique class explores principles formulated by modern dance pioneers such as Jose Limon, Marta Graham, Lester Horton, and Merce Cunningham. It addresses kinesthetic awareness, body alignment, centering and weight, quality of movement, dynamics, flow, and use of space. Incorporated into this class is also the study of contemporary music focusing on asymmetrical rhythms and phrasings.

Honors Repertoire

In Ballet Repertoire, students learn a diverse range of ballet styles from Classical to Romantic, Neo- classical, and Contemporary. In this class, students develop rehearsal skills and learn to adapt to a diverse range of choreography from already established to new, original works. The Modern Repertoire students learn a diverse range of styles chosen from the modern or contemporary dance styles. In this class, students develop rehearsal skills and learn to adapt to a diverse range of original choreographic works.

Pilates & Anatomy for Dancers

This Pilates and Anatomy class emphasizes mat work and the use of small apparatus. Course work will include a continuation from sophomore Pilates of the mat work exercises themselves at an advancing level and their practical application, as well as anatomical and movement analysis of the work. Additional emphasis is given to application of the work in dance and its benefit for injury prevention and care. Coursework includes the exploration of the practical applications of anatomy in dance through area-specific strength and flexibility exercises, body awareness practice, and alignment/placement correction work. The course works in conjunction with Pilates, Grade Level 11. Student performance evaluation and grading will be based upon the following: class participation (punctuality, attendance, attitude, effort, energy, initiative, concentration, growth, collaboration, performance), written assignments, and physical assessment.

Pilates

This Pilates-based program emphasizing mat work and the use of small apparatus. Course work will include introduction to the foundational principles, alignment basics, breath work, muscular awareness, the mat work exercises themselves, and the practical application of those exercises.

Audition Preparation/Senior Showcase

This class prepares students for successful auditions at both the college and the professional levels. Company audition and college application preparation is addressed through individual consultation, personal research, and through coaching of class work material as well as solo performance work. Seniors will also prepare, with the supervision of the faculty, a studio performance showcasing the various dance-related fields such as dancer, choreographer, costumer, producer, presenter, dance writer, and dance videographer.

Special Seminars

This course emphasizes a concentrated examination of diverse dance-related subject matter to broaden the student’s experience and knowledge Sophomore: Nutrition, Health and Wellness, and Aspects of Production Junior: Stretch & Strength, Yoga, and Aspects of Production

Honors Ensemble Applied Music - Grade Level: 10-12

Ensemble Applied Music provides training in ensemble performance through participation in large ensembles and chamber music. Students of orchestral instruments participate in Concertato String Orchestra or Wind Ensemble as large ensembles, and also in chamber music for smaller combinations of instruments. Strings and Winds combine the last third of each semester for a Chamber Orchestra (Sinfonia) concert. Vocalists participate in Cantus Chamber Choir as a conducted ensemble and in Opera Workshop for experience in theatrical literature and performance. Pianists focus on chamber literature for their instrument. Additionally, all music students sing in the Governor’s School Choir each semester they are enrolled. The ensembles that give credit for Ensemble Applied Music are: Governor’s School Choir Chamber Choir (Cantus) Chamber Orchestra (Sinfonia) String Orchestra (Concertato) Wind Ensemble Chamber Music (Winds, Brass, Percussion, Strings, Harp) Opera Workshop Piano Ensemble

Twentieth-Century Music

This course explores developments in music theory and history as they relate to musical style in the modern era. Open to third year students and others by permission of instructor.

Honors Motion Design I

This course is a simple introduction to the concept of sequence and time-based imagery. The course serves to build comfort and familiarity with the process of creating animated media. The class will introduce some of the foundations of traditional animation such as onion-skinning, moving holds, and exposure sheets. The course works in conjunction with 2-D and 3-D Design, Observational Drawing, Introduction to Graphic Design, and Visual Language to create the core of the Foundation Year.

Honors Motion Design II

This class will focus on utilizing the building blocks of motion to create believable and expressive movements. In this course, students will learn fundamental actions through intensive timing and spacing exercises as well as action analysis.

Historical Dance and Character

Historical Dances can be found in many classical ballets of the 16th through the 19th centuries. This course focuses on the study of such historical dances as the Allemande, Sarabanda, Romanesco, Minuet, Gavotte, and the Waltz. Character dance is a stylized representation of traditional folk or National Dance, mostly from European countries, found in Classical Ballet. This course includes the study of Russian, Ukranian, Moldavian, Polish, Hungarian, Spanish, Oriental, and Gypsy dances.

Methodology

The Methodology course includes the study of terminology of Classical Ballet movements and their correct execution. Students will learn to choreograph class combinations using proper rhythm, meter, and phrasing.

Ballet Coaching/Stretch & Strength

This Ballet Coaching class helps students gain a greater and deeper understanding of the physicality and artistry involved in ballet technique class. Students work slowly and carefully on concepts such as aplomb/stance, body alignment and correct skeletal and muscular application to acquire greater strength and flexibility. Additionally, through careful and informed practice of cardiovascular conditioning and strength and stretch exercises, students will enhance and supplement their overall fitness and help prevent dance-related injuries.

Improvisation/Composition

Through various structured movement improvisation exercises, students will develop spontaneous movements and exploration skills and gain a broader, freer, and more natural sense of movement. Students will then use problem solving techniques to explore the various facets of dance making.

Dance History

Dance History gives the student an overview of the historical and cultural influences that shaped Western Concert Dance. It will explore the development of ballet as well as forces that were influential in the development of modern dance in America.

Music for Dancers - A Dancer's Working Guide to Music

Music for Dancers serves as an overview of music’s essential elements, historical periods, composers and compositions to offer the dance student a greater understanding of the art form and create a more, well-rounded and balanced Artist. Music for Dancers is a year-long course designed to provide SCGSAH dancers a background in music fundamentals. Through lessons in theory, composition, history and technology, students develop a more thorough understanding of music necessary for the working dancer. Music for Dancers is an interactive course allowing students hands-on experience playing and interpreting rhythm, melody and harmony while reinforcing connections to previously studied dance curriculum. At the end of the fall term, students will draw upon their full range of skills to deliver a live presentation/performance.

AP Language and Composition

This seminar will provide regular close reading and writing practice connected to a course of study in literature from a variety of historical and cultural perspectives. Many of the readings in the course are non-fiction, in order to prepare students for the types of readings and analytical, expository writing they will find on the AP exam and in the college writing courses for which it awards credit. In addition to the prerequisite above, students considering this course should keep in mind the intensity of its demands and the rigors of the AP exam in May.

AP Biology

In this course, students explore questions about the living world by examining the levels of organization that define life, from the cell to entire ecosystems. Topics will include the chemical foundations of biology, the cellular basis of life, Mendelian and molecular genetics, evolution and ecology. Students taking this course are required to take the AP exam in the spring.